Timothy Carter

Chief Revenue Officer at SEO Company

Industry veteran Timothy Carter is SEO.co’s Chief Revenue Officer. Tim leads all revenue for the company and oversees all customer-facing teams for SEO (search engine optimization) – including sales, marketing & customer success.

He has spent more than 20 years in the world of SEO & Digital Marketing leading, building and scaling sales operations, helping companies increase revenue efficiency and drive growth from websites and sales teams.

When he’s not working, Tim enjoys playing a few rounds of disc golf, running, and spending time with his wife and family on the beach…preferably in Hawaii.

Over the years he’s written for publications like ForbesEntrepreneur, Marketing Land, Search Engine Journal, ReadWrite and other highly respected online publications. Connect with Tim on Linkedin & Twitter.

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Content Length: What's the Ideal Length of a Blog Post for SEO
Timothy Carter

Content Length: What’s the Ideal Length of a Blog Post for SEO in 2024?

There are many topics in content marketing open for debate, but few have been as elusive to evidentiary proof as the length of the “perfect” blog post. To some, the longer a blog post the better, and there’s a clear argumentative case for it; more words in an article mean more “guts” for web crawlers and readers, and indicate that an article is thorough and in-depth. But, let’s look at some high-level stats related to blog post and content length that will be applicable: The average 1st result on Google has a blog length of 1,500 words. Source: Backlinko Content with >7,000 words gets more than 3x the number of shares and links. Source: MarketingCharts Blog posts are getting longer: the average blog post length is now over 1,400 words long. Source: OrbitMedia When it comes to the first five positions in Google, shorter length appears to have a higher correlation to first page rankings. Source: CognitiveSEO  Longer posts (2,000 words+) tend to rank higher and more readily appear in the top 10. Source: CapsicumMediaworks While a correlation exists between longer length, the correlation is small and gets even less important as you look at larger data set (i.e. beyond the top 10 search results), likely due to the fact that more content is getting longer overall. Source: CanIRank  There is a strong correlation between content length and the number of acquired backlinks to a particular blog post. Source: Hubspot Longer content (>10,000 words) can actually hurt your rankings, especially when content is not “on point” and fails to nail search intent for users. Source: SurferSEO 75% of content on the internet is never shared, referenced or linked to. Source: Moz On the other hand, constantly shooting for super-high word counts can leave you with fluff, or can alienate the vast portions of your audience who are interested in a quick read. So what’s the answer? The evidence suggests the reality of an “ideal” blog length is much more complicated than a simple answer of “long” or “short.” Ambiguous Results of Ideal Content Length More important than word count is this: Your article should answer the intended query of the visitor. If it does that in 100 words better than another site can do in 10,000, then you win. Unfortunately, a thorough answer is typically not 100 words long. Having a popular blog is all about keeping your content updated with fresh and informative content. Your visitors are going to like seeing that the blog is kept updated and that the articles they are reading provide them with some information that they happen to be seeking. Whether you make the decision to write your own blog entries or hire someone to do this for you, it is a good idea to carefully consider the word count so that your visitors are kept entertained when reading the content on your site each and every time they happen to visit your blog. For some examples please visit the SEO.co blog to learn more. Keep in mind, many of our blog articles range from 500 words to nearly 20,000. The ultimate length of a given blog post may differ depending on many factors, including: Industry niche. Some queries might require a long, detailed explanation while others could be a simple answer in 200 words or less. Search intent. The intent of the searcher has a sway on how a given piece of content might rank visa-a-vis competitors. Sometimes search intent can be answered quickly. Sometimes not. Website domain authority. You might have the most extensive post or page on a subject, but if your content remains untested and lacks the right signals (e.g. backlinks) it’s less likely to outrank competing pages. Internal signals. Shorter posts with a lot of internal links, including header/footer links, are more likely to rank than orphaned pages buried deep with no internal links. Length has less of a sway in such cases. Average Content Length of Top 10 Google Search Results There’s no simple answer for the “ideal” length of a blog post, but there are some interesting trends when it comes to post length for SEO. According to this recent analysis, about 85 percent of the articles in this golden 25 percent contained fewer than 1,000 words. About 12 percent of articles shared had between 1,000 and 2,000 words, and less than 2.7 percent contained more than 2,000 words. According to this information, the shorter your article is, the better. However, when it comes to the number of shares an article gets, the longer an article is, the better. Average Article Page Views & Shares by Length Articles of under 1,000 words tended to get an average of 3.47 shares and links, with 1,000-2,000 word articles getting an average of 6.92, and articles of 3,000 words or more getting a massive 11.07! According to this information, the longer your article is, the better. This leads to a tricky conundrum, but let me try and simplify it: shorter articles have a higher likelihood of getting shares, but they also tend to attract a fewer number of shares. Longer articles have a lower likelihood of getting shares, but when they do, they attract large numbers of shares. Average Word Count of a Post by Rank But, when it comes to the top 5 results in Google, the length tends to shorten, compared to those further down in the search rankings: Median Content Length by Rank for Top 40 Results When you expand out the view for the top 40 results, the results clearly conclude there is a small (but still evident) correlation between length and rank: Word Count vs. Average Linking Domains There is also a strong correlation between the length of your post and the number of backlinks pointing to it: Average Total Content Shares The vast majority of content online is never shared or referenced: So What is the Ideal Blog Post Length? If you have a niche that specializes in one type of content over another,

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Timothy Carter

Why Pay for Performance SEO Is a Bad Idea

There’s a reason you want to practice search engine optimization (SEO). You want to see results. You might want to see higher keyword rankings. You might want to see higher rates of organic traffic. You might want to see higher revenue. You might want all three, and then some. So it makes sense that you want to pay for an SEO agency based not on what they do, but on what they help you achieve. On the surface, it’s quite sensible. But in reality, this approach – which we call “pay for performance” SEO – is a bad idea. In the short term, you might get exactly what you want. But in the long term, you’ll pay a hefty price. Let’s figure out why – and introduce a much better alternative. The Basics: What Is Pay for Performance SEO? As the name suggests, pay for performance SEO is a particular approach to SEO that requires clients to pay not for specific services or hours worked, but instead for results that are achieved. As an analogy, this would be like paying a professional basketball player a fixed amount for each point they score, rather than paying them a salary for the year. Generally, pay for performance SEO agencies charge you money based on their achievements in one or more of the following areas:       Keyword rankings. Pay for performance SEO agencies usually prioritize keyword rankings, charging you based on the number of rank-one positions they achieve or the number of page-one rankings they achieve.       Organic traffic. They may also charge you based on organic traffic, allowing you to pay only for organic traffic increases they measurably provide.       Revenue. Some pay for performance SEO agencies go a step further and charge you based on additional revenue generated by their services. This is a bit harder to calculate, but it can still be done. The Understandable Allure of Pay-for-Performance SEO The general idea of pay for performance SEO makes logical sense. You can technically do SEO yourself, for free, and see decent results. So why should you pay money for an SEO agency that doesn’t bring you results? And why should you pay an absurd amount of money for an SEO agency that barely does better than you can? Pay for performance SEO is a meritocratic system that works in the interests of both parties using it, presumably. The SEO agency is inclined to attract and keep more clients, and clients are incentivized to seek these agencies, so they can ensure that their SEO investments pay off. If you’re only paying for measurable results, it’s impossible to waste your money. And if pay for performance SEO agencies are only making money when they achieve results, they must be doing good work. Right? The Dark Side of Pay for Performance SEO Unfortunately, this type of system has a dark side – and quite an ugly one. The apparent appeal of this strategy rests on its incentive structure. On the surface, it looks like SEO agencies are incentivized, by this model, to produce the best possible results. But there’s an important caveat here. Pay for performance SEO agencies are incentivized to produce the best possible results within a given timeframe; they aren’t necessarily incentivized to seek results for the long term, nor are they incentivized to pursue sustainable SEO strategies or follow best practices. On top of that, if you’re paying one of these SEO agencies for achieving results in only one area, they may neglect other areas. It’s not hard to imagine examples of how this plays out – and we’ve even seen some of these examples in real life. Imagine that you pay a pay for performance SEO agency for each page-one ranking they help you achieve. But because of this incentive, they only go after extremely niche, long tail keyword phrases that have minimal search volume and traffic; as a result, your organic traffic doesn’t really increase. Imagine that you pay this type of agency based on the new organic traffic they send your way over the course of a few months. The agency builds a bunch of spammy links, skyrocketing your traffic, but eventually causing your rankings and your reputation to plummet. Imagine that you pay this agency for the revenue they generate for your brand. They optimize your website for conversions and produce a relentless stream of keyword-optimized content – but after a few months of decent revenue increases, your search rankings collapse and your customers begin to leave. Realistically, pay for performance isn’t inherently bad. It’s just associated with really bad outcomes when this type of agency exploits incentives in violation of best practices. And unfortunately, this happens a lot. And since today’s SEO is more difficult and complex than ever, it’s best to operate under the auspices of sustainability rather than get-ranked-quick gains. Pay for Performance SEO vs. Sustainable SEO The antithesis of pay for performance SEO is sustainable SEO. Sustainable SEO is designed to be followed and appreciated in perpetuity. It promotes white hat strategies, general best practices, and tactics that build a positive reputation and trust. In other words, sustainable SEO doesn’t care about immediate results or vanity metrics. In fact, practitioners of sustainable SEO don’t care about a few slow months; they’re more interested in the long-term benefits of doing things right. Does this mean all sustainable SEO practitioners are better than all pay for performance SEO practitioners? Not necessarily. You can find bad examples of the former and good examples of the latter. What’s important is that you realize pay for performance isn’t necessarily a good thing and should never be your sole determining factor when choosing an SEO agency. In fact, unless you have good reason to suspect otherwise, the pay for performance model should be considered a red flag. The Most Common Pay for Performance SEO Agency Tactics We’ll stress this again: pay for performance SEO isn’t always terrible, and pay for performance

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How to Build Quality Links Without Investing Heavily in Content
Timothy Carter

How to Build Quality Links Without Investing Heavily in Content

Quality on-site content will help you earn more quality backlinks. But what if you want backlinks, but don’t have the time or resources to invest heavily in content? For this type of link building, you’ll need to invest more heavily in relationships, rather than content. In short, free backlinks are rarely free. The highest quality backlinks will take time and resources to acquire, whether you acquire them passively (through on-site content) or actively through outreach. Below is more information about how you can get more links for your site without spending a lot of money on content. Adding links in the ways highlighted here can boost your rank in search engines just like high-quality SEO services can. Brand Mentions An effective way to collect more relevant links is by checking for other sites that mention you. There isn’t a better way to find a natural link than to link with sites that have talked about you. It’s an easy concept: You find a website that mentioned your URL or product. Of course, in the ideal world, this mention happened recently. But if you’re promoting a new brand or product, you can get away with linking an older mention. When you find a site that’s mentioned you, great! You’ve done half the work. The rest is reaching out to the owner or webmaster. You can start your outreach by telling them how much you appreciated them mentioning your brand. Then, simply ask for a link. Of course, you’ll need to use common sense to determine if you want the link. For example, did the person positively mention your site or brand? Does the site have a lot of traffic, and how many unique visitors per month? Is the link logical between your companies? To maximize your chances of turning a mention into a link, focus on building the relationship first. Then, talk about getting a link. You may even need to start with a brand mention that simply acts as an inferred link and move the relationship down the chain from there. Broken Links Building links through broken links is another excellent way to boost links without investing in content. The idea is to look for broken site links on other sites that have pages like yours. Next, reach out to the site owner, tell them about the broken link, and show how linking to your site serves their interests. There are many ways you can use the dead link strategy in your campaign to increase sit links. First, some website owners look for older, relevant resource pages and write fresh blog posts and other content. Next, you reach out to any site linking to the outdated content; tell them about how your new content is better. Another way is when a related company goes under. You can get links by looking for pages that point to the dead website. Many companies like to add links by looking for dead links and pages. Use Guest Posts Some websites don’t link to use guest posts now because it has become popular with spammers. But guest posting is still an effective way to build links for free. Finding places to get featured with a guest blog post might sound complex, but if you just make a quick Google search, you can often find dozens of websites with guest posting in your industry. Once you find a site in your niche that accepts guest posts, reach out to the site owner. Talk about how your guest post will dovetail with the purpose of their site. Play up how the post will benefit them. If you have carefully crafted your subject, so it appeals to that site owner, you should be able to snag a link. Build An Affiliate Program Making an affiliate program is another effective way to generate backlinks. If you can create customized affiliate links, you can generate many links deep on your site to product pages; this is what many SEO gurus dream of! You also can tell the website the page they should be linking to. Curate Content Content curation is a low-cost and effective way to market your company without investing in content. You simply find top-notch existing content that other sites have published and put it on your own website and social media channels – with attribution. Reposting excellent content that others have written is a great way to provide value to your followers and customers. And you don’t even have to pay for or write unique content. You can use content curation to build links because it sets you up as an authority in the business. Every time you post valuable, innovative content, your audience will start to turn to you for relevant content in that niche. They’ll begin to view you as their go-to information source. People will go to your site and social media channels for the content you offer, even if you didn’t write it. When the content has top value, you’ll notice that you are getting more links. Remember that gaining links this way takes time. Many sites need to curate content effectively for months before they see rewards. But curating quality content is an effective way to get backlinks without spending more than a few minutes on the task every day. Over months and years, curated content can get high-quality links from the start. Summary We hope we’ve illustrated here that you have many options to build links without investing as much in new content. But this doesn’t mean that you should ignore writing fresh, innovative content. If this list isn’t enough, consider our list of 77 link building strategies for SEO. Google places an extremely high value on websites that generate relevant, unique content that other users value and share with others. Getting backlinks without content would be like trying to rank without backlinks. Is it possible in today’s complex and increasingly-difficult world of search engine optimization? To a degree, maybe, but not in the long run if you want

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Improve the Quality of Your Online Leads
Timothy Carter

How to Improve the Quality of Your Online Leads

For most online marketers, success boils down to how much revenue your campaign generates. That revenue is tied to paying customers, and paying customers are just leads who made it through the sales funnel. Accordingly, many online marketers measure their success in terms of how many leads they were able to generate. It’s a good number to know, for sure, but there’s one major problem with it: it doesn’t tell you how good those leads are. Working with five great bottom-of-the-funnel leads is better–and will result in more revenue–than 100 irrelevant or uninterested leads from some tangential whitepaper download on your website. That 100 number is a flashy vanity metric, but without substantive lead quality, it’s essentially useless. We write a lot about increasing traffic to your site and improving conversion rates, and this is important for B2B and B2C companies alike. When most people talk about “conversion optimization,” they’re talking about increasing high-quality leads.  What follows is a discussion on lead quality, why it matters and how to improve lead quality.  Let’s dive in. Why Lead Quality Matters If you’ve ever been in a sales position, you know why lead quality matters. Low quality leads are people who aren’t interested in your product or brand, or those who are just interested in finding out more details without really buying anything (tire-kickers). They may even be people who fall outside your demographics if you’re generating leads automatically. All this is a problem because every “weak” lead you spend time on is wasted time you could have spent on a high quality lead. You might get fewer leads overall, but your sales ratio will be much better. How to Filter Your Leads for Quality If you’re just getting started with online marketing or conversion optimization, you might want to focus on quantity first—there’s no use trying to filter two leads down to one lead, but once you start getting dozens or hundreds of leads on a regular basis, you’ll need to focus that stream down to only what’s most important. Here’s how you do it: Improve Content Targeting to Improve Lead Quality This first option might seem obvious, but it’s easy to neglect. Your content is responsible for the majority of your inbound traffic and early interested leads—it attracts people from search engines and social media, and forms visitors’ impressions of your site when they start poking around. The type of topics you pick can have a drastic impact on the people who eventually choose to convert. For example, if you write about basic, general topics in your industry, you’ll tend to attract leads who are nearly unfamiliar with your type of company and industry best practices. If you need qualified leads with more experience or familiarity, you’ll have to increase the vocabulary and change the focus of your articles. Your content marketing strategy, if executed with care, can be your greatest source of incoming leads. Writing regular high-quality content and using the power of social media channels to syndicate that content will naturally attract dozens, and in time, hundreds of leads to your website. In order to maximize the conversion potential for those leads, and ensure that those leads are as qualified as possible, you need to adjust your content marketing strategy accordingly. For example, if you own a law firm, but you only do work with business clients, writing content about consumer-focused law and litigation work might attract a large number of people to your blog—but those people wouldn’t belong to your key demographic, and your lead quality would correspondingly decline. It’s better to write and publish content that caters to a highly specific type of person—the kind of person you’d love to come in as a lead. Refine Your Social Media Efforts Just like content, the things you publish on social media can have an effect on who comes to your site. However, on social media, you have more control over who comes into and remains in your pool of followers. For example, you can target specific demographics to reach out to and build an audience person by person to increase the percentage of connections who fall into your targeted demographics. You can also use segmented lists to filter out those who might not be relevant—such as people outside your geographic area. Additionally, you (or a member of your team) can spend more time on social media, reaching out to individuals you know would make good leads and following them. This will get their attention and gradually shift your following to be mostly comprised of prequalified leads. Segment Your Landing Pages If your content and social adjustments don’t help, you can consider funneling people to different landing pages based on their intentions (and possibly behavior). For example, let’s say you offer three different levels of service: one for beginners one for experts one as a white-label SEO service through a reseller program Here, you can create three different landing pages with specific copy that only appeals to one of these demographics (each). You can also use these landing pages for proper lead scoring and lead segmentation. If your marketing efforts funnel lots of mixed traffic to each of these pages, they’ll naturally filter out any leads who aren’t qualified for each specific service. You should also be using your CRM (customer relationship management) system to do more lead scoring and quality lead filtering. Funnel Conversions Into an Email Campaign Instead of attempting to get leads right away, turn your main site of conversion into a “prospective lead” generator. When you get someone to fill out your form, subscribe them to an ongoing email campaign (or similar marketing strategy that keeps your brand top-of-mind). A portion of these subscribers—only the most interested—will open your emails regularly, and might even reach out directly to you. With every email, your pool of prospective leads will grow warmer toward your brand, and uninterested parties will naturally unsubscribe, allowing your lead pool to filter itself. Make the Conversion More Demanding (But, Be

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Off-Page SEO: The MOST Important Off-Page SEO Tactics You'll Need
Timothy Carter

Off-Page SEO: Strategies & Best Practices for Off-Site SEO

No one really knows the exact formula(s) Google uses for ranking websites, and no one knows exactly how sites are ranked for various keywords. Google has set out some guidelines to live by, and by trial-and-error, top SEOs have uncovered some a few factors for optimizing a site for search. But correlation often does not imply causation, especially when it comes to ranking highly for competitive keywords. Most Important Off-Page SEO Factors Let’s analyze six of the most important off-page SEO ranking factors you should always pay attention to, based on the rules by which Google — and other search engines — want us to play the SEO game. 1. Creating backlinks Backlinks are one of the foundations of SEO. Backlinks are outside links to your site. In other words, they are links from other people’s websites. People choose to link back to your content because they have found it to be relevant and useful. However, you can also create backlinks yourself by posting content that links back to your site via social media profiles and directories. These days, one of the best and most powerful ways to create backlinks is to engage guest posting services on other authoritative and high-PR blogs. Also, if you want to attract tons of high-quality backlinks to your site, it inevitably comes back to this: You have to create interesting, timely, and relevant content that people active in your niche would want to link to, and you have to do it on a consistent and continual basis. That is the ultimate guarantee that links around your site will be created naturally. But, when it comes to building links for off-page SEO, it is important to remember that it is NOT the most important SEO ranking factor. It is one of hundreds, so don’t focus on off-page SEO to the exclusion of other factors! 2. Quality, quality, and quality Linking back from sites with higher authority than yours will help jack up your own authority. However, you need to be careful when picking sites from which to link back. Before Google did a major overhaul on their algorithm, quantity seemed to be the dominating factor behind successful off-page SEO strategy. Today, quality trumps quantity. Quality backlinking calls for links from very relevant and high-authority sites. You want to create links from sites with good reputation, and ideally they will relate only to your niche. 3. Relevance The more relevant the site you are linking from, the better. There’s little advantage in creating backlinks from home improvement sites if you are working around the gadgets and electronics industry. 4. Diversify Don’t just link from one source or one type of site. Link back from as many different kinds as possible. Create links from blogs, industry directories, article directories, forums, and social media properties. The more you diversify your backlinks, the more you’ll attract traffic from a variety of sources. A diversity of backlinks is one of the best off-page SEO strategies that will increase your chances of winning a favorable ranking from Google. 5. Pace naturally Creating several hundred links to a new site within days is a recipe for disaster. It raises red flags and runs the risk of being deemed unnatural. Keep your off-page SEO natural by building several links at a regular pace; say, two to five per business day. 6. Anchor text Here’s where Google Penguin has lowered the boom on many thousands of sites. The norm used to be for SEOs to create tons of exact-match anchor text. These days, the Penguin wants to see variations or you will pay a huge price and see a significant drop in rankings and traffic. You can still use exact-match anchor texts, but keep them to a minimum. Use related terms and keywords for variations. Off-page SEO Issues that Can Effect Rankings Almost every strategy under the SEO umbrella can be categorized as “on-page SEO” vs. “off-page SEO.” On-page SEO refers to all the site structuring, basic setup, and ongoing work you do on your domain, while offsite refers to anything that happens away from that domain. Strategies like guest posting, link building, and social media marketing all fall into the off-page SEO category, and are critical if you want to rank for any cluster of keywords. Depending on the size of your site and on how many people have access to it, odds are your on-page SEO structure and content aren’t going to change frequently. Occasionally, you should run an onsite audit to ensure no new pages have gone untitled or no duplicate pages have been indexed, but unless there’s a serious SEO performance issue with your site, it’s unlikely that an onsite hiccup can cause your rankings to fall. If you see unexpected volatility and your on-site SEO is in order, the only reasonable possibility is that something has gone wrong with your off-page SEO. There are five common offsite SEO hiccups that can interfere with your rankings, but fortunately, all of them have relatively easy fixes: 1. Low-quality source links. If you’re experienced in SEO, you know the deal; off-page SEO backlinks are necessary for building authority and building on low-quality sources is easy, but can actively damage your reputation depending on the source. A rogue link pointing to your domain on a scam site or a virtually unknown publisher could drive your domain authority down and prevent you free gaining any positive momentum. There are a few ways links like these could pop up. They could be remnants from an older strategy, or links you forgot you built. They could be links built by someone else on your team without your knowledge. They might have even been built without your company’s consent. In any case, you can find them using a link search tool like Moz’s Open Site Explorer, and usually get them taken down with a simple request to the webmaster in question. 2. Heavy-handed or spammy links. Just because your link is on a medium- to high-authority source doesn’t

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30 Marketing Automation Tools to Make Your Life Easier
Timothy Carter

30 Best Marketing Automation Tools for SEO Companies

Marketing automation refers to any tool designed to take some kind of otherwise manual, time-intensive process in your marketing strategy and make it happen automatically. While we may be several years away from seeing your marketing career jeopardized by AI and automation, we’re already living in an age where your marketing career can be defined by the technology you’re using (or neglecting). Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of marketing automation software and using the best tools for the job can dramatically increase your results—and save you time in the process. Why Marketing Automation Tools? via GIPHY The value proposition of marketing automation benefits is simple. A quality marketing automation platform saves you (and your team) time. Assuming you have a list of 20 tasks to do in a day, and automation can take care of 5 of them, you’ll instantly save 25 percent of your time—which you can then devote to more high-value efforts, like brainstorming, analyzing, or making new connections. Another perk of automation is giving you more data, which you can use to measure and analyze the results of your campaign. Because these marketing efforts are repetitive, and logged in the app you’re using, it’s usually easy to generate a report that tells you exactly how your landing page strategy is performing. 30 Marketing Automation Tools Let’s take a look at some of the best marketing automation tools on the market today. Integrated marketing automation platforms These automation platforms focus on a wide range of different functionalities and features: 1. SAP Sales Cloud. Once known as CallidusCloud, the SAP Sales Cloud is a sales and marketing performance management tool. It’s designed to automate your lead identification process, getting rid of leads that seem unqualified or too high-risk to follow up with. 2. Bremy. Bremy, by Solution Dynamics, is an automation tool to help you create and manage email newsletters, database publishing, and video proofing, among other features. You can use it across channels, which makes it especially appealing to multi-channel campaign runners. 3. Marketo. Marketo was designed with lead nurturing in mind. You can use it to automate various features of your lead management, consumer marketing, email marketing, and customer relationship development. 4. Contactually. Contactually is an automatic CRM designed with real estate agents in mind, but you can use it for your sales and marketing strategy as well. It takes contact information from your inbox and social media profiles and fleshes out that information as fully as possible. 5. AdRoll. AdRoll focuses on automating your retargeting campaigns, especially through social platforms like Facebook and Twitter. You can use it to segment audiences and track your analytics across channels as well. 6. Dialog Tech. If you rely on inbound phone calls as part of your marketing campaign, consider Dialog Tech. It automates your voice interactions and gives you metrics you can use to analyze the effectiveness of your campaigns. 7. LeadSquared. There’s also LeadSquared. It’s designed to help you identify and store lead information from multiple channels, including emails, online forms, phone calls, and your website’s chat. 8. Bizible. Bizible was created with the intention of closing the gap between marketing and sales. You can use it in combination with AdWords to automate your ad campaigns and get a high-level picture of your success in getting leads and closing sales. 9. Act-On. Act-On is another lead nurturing and marketing automation platform with a ton of automation-focused features. It can help you design a landing page, track your inbound and outbound leads, and automate all your customer emails. 10. Hatchbuck. If you’re looking to optimize your CRM and marketing efforts, you could use Hatchbuck. It helps you create and assign tags, which you can use to categorize and better track your incoming leads. 11. Genoo. Genoo is an integrated platform with multiple features. It can help you profile customers, evaluate incoming leads, and even create new landing pages. There’s also a built-in CMS with activity tracking. 12. E-goi. E-goi is ideal if you’re looking to use email marketing in combination with other communication methods. It helps you automate a campaign that sends updates via other mediums like SMS text and voice messages. 13. Pardot. Pardot is home to a number of tools designed to automate your marketing needs. It integrates with your CRM, offers a built-in feature to evaluate leads, and even reports on the ROI of your campaigns. 14. Keap. Keap is a client management tool, and the company also offers a tool called InfusionSoft. Together, these tools help you automate your sales and marketing strategies, track leads, and nurture them. 15. HubSpot. If content marketing is your jam, Hubspot is the marketing automation tool for you. It has numerous built-in features to help you create content, optimize it for SEO, and manage your email and social media campaigns. 16. Intercom. Intercom is designed to help you create and execute automatic conversations for app users. It’s ideal for helping users understand your app or guiding them to specific areas of content. Email-specific automation tools These automation tools focus more heavily on email marketing, specifically, as it’s one of the easiest forms of marketing to automate: 17. MailChimp. The folks at MailChimp have made a name for themselves in the industry by offering one of the simplest and most efficient email automation tools on the market. Creating campaigns, managing list segments, and enabling drip campaigns are all relatively straightforward. 18. ConvertKit. ConvertKit offers many features you might find in a CRM but is more focused on helping you create automatic responses, sometimes in a complicated chain of programmed responses. 19. Drip. Drip is, appropriately enough, designed for automating and managing drip email campaigns. It has tons of pre-made templates and can guide you through the creation process if you’re new to it. 20. GoViral. GoViral is a free tool used to encourage your email subscribers to share your latest content. If your subscribers share on social media or via email, they can get a free bonus. 21. Reach Mail. There’s also Reach Mail, which helps you compare up to five email

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